Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

The premium tent market is a pretty crowded space, but the revamped Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent caught our eye with a simple design and light weight – read on for the full Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review!

The Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent is – broadly speaking – an update to the older Nordisk Halland 2 PU tent, which is nearly double the new LW official weight at a chunky 3kg, but is now available for nearly half the price (see below). As well as tweaking the design, Nordisk have sourced new DAC NFL poles and halved the weight by using lighter fabrics, but neat design touches abound – let’s take a look.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

 

Up front the Nordisk Halland tent range are proper old-school tunnel tents in the best sense of the word – two light poles, numerous guylines make for a solid structure under anything but the worst side winds. Here’s Nordisk’s own wind test, which you’ll notice is conducted along the length of the tunnel tent, rather than across it – of course this is a major consideration in pitching it correctly – crosswinds be bad, captain.

The tunnel tent is a robust and lightweight design, and relatively simple to erect in the dark first time. The only flaw in the pitching setup is down to Nordisk’s pursuit of lightness here, where the poles sleeves are simple unlined tunnels made of the main flysheet fabric – Diamond embossed rip stop 68D yarn, a thread count of 185, which brings the weight to a featherlight 64 g/m2, and the hydrostatic head is 3000 mm for those that wanted to know. The PU coated inner grabs the poles, making pitching and striking much harder than it would be if the pole tunnels were lined, and probably less durable in the longer term, but that’s probably 100 grams (and more manufacturing cost) so them’s the breaks.

nordisk-halland-2-tent-review-16

The Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent is a ‘pitch as one’ style beast, which is lovely on a moor in the slashing rain, and the inner can be stripped out for outer-only tarp-stylee business, which is a nice to have, but a faff to achieve. This faff is due to the intricate and ingenious linkages between inner and flysheet, which incorporate a rubber ‘o’ ring for shock absorbtion. This is brilliant for clumsy climbers and harsh weather, but terrible for dismantling. As a compromise it’s a good one we think, as the former two come along a lot more often.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

Neat touches here include dyneema cords linking the pole eyelets, so you can’t over-tension the structure, aluminum pole eyelets and also alu buckles to tension the pole pegs. The Dac poles are solid as ever, and the lightweight pegs are a decent compromise – the tri-bladed little stakes are durable enough to cope with rough ground, just won’t have the holding power of a bigger, heavier stake.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

Overall it’s a quality experience, and so it should be at around the £400 mark. As ever, cost is a big consideration here, and with the Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent (£417) coming in at more than double the price of it’s older sibling, the Nordisk Halland 2 PU tent (£170), that weight saving question is really crucial here. The older and heavier PU model features heavier fabrics, and also Aluminium Tarp Poles instead of the more cutting edge DAC models of the LW version.

You’ll notice there’s a roomy porch area – enough for 2 peoples rucksacks and boots, and the interior is relatively palatial.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

There’s plenty of space for two mats, and a host of storage pockets will keep things vaguely organised. In one of these is a brilliant idea – like a lightweight jacket that stuffs into its chest pocket, the Halland LW packs into the right hand door pocket.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

There’s compression straps to boot, meaning you can dispense with the separate bag when on the hill.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

This takes the weight (according to our scales) down to 1,385g when packed into the internal pocket bag, with poles and pegs in their integrated bag (essentially a normal pole bag with a little peg pocket). That’s jolly light for a proper 2 man, and it’s worth reiterating a lot of the build quality here is that of a much heavier mountain tent, which is a great comfort when exposed to the rigours of tired climbing partners hefalumping into it.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

 

Overall, the Nordisk is a fantastic lightweight tent, with very little faff and nonsense to it, and some lovely little touches. Here’s a few worthy of mention – the closes with magnets rather than velcro fasteners, which surely adds several grams to the whole setup, but is pretty slick in use. The integrated tent bag is genius, and the integrated peg and pole bag saves weight and also combines the two vital elements to save the forgetful.

Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent review

With pole sleeves it would be pretty much ideal for lightweight climbing and mountain use, and without it’s still a pretty strong candidate. However, the competition is considerable – there are lighter tents, cheaper tents – and for that matter more expensive ones to boot (Hilleberg for a start). The Alpkit Ordos 2 tent  is less than half the money, and less weighty, but slightly less robust in construction.

Essentially, it’s hard not to like the Nordisk’s charms, but they do come at a premium.

The Nordisk Halland 2 LW tent (£417) is available now, as is the Nordisk Halland 2 PU tent (£170).

How to rack your gear better

Happy rack - happy you.